Give Nature Her Carbon Back! Here’s How!

Let’s Stop With The Gimicky Solutions For Carbon Emissions Reductions!

Geoengineering, is the deliberate, large-scale intervention in the Earth’s climatic system through methods such as creating artificial clouds to try to brighten the earth and thereby reflect the sun’s energy or spraying sulfur or some other chemical into the atmosphere to accomplish the same thing.  Another method uses lasers to create rain clouds.

The problem with this thought process is that it invites corporate involvement to manage the currently unmanageable, and at the same time ignores systemic changes that humans need to make, such as reducing carbon emissions and creating sustainable and responsible farming practices.

An article in TheGuardian.com gives us more insight to a much simpler way to address global warming – – regenerative agriculture.  However, while potentially highly effective, it will still require a global commitment to reducing carbon emissions.

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Regenerative agriculture comprises an array of techniques that rebuild soil and, in the process, sequester carbon. Typically, it uses cover crops and perennials so that bare soil is never exposed, and grazes animals in ways that mimic animals in nature. It also offers ecological benefits far beyond carbon storage: it stops soil erosion, remineralises soil, protects the purity of groundwater and reduces damaging pesticide and fertiliser runoff.

………. While comprehensive statistics are hard to come by, yields from regenerative methods often exceed conventional yields (see here and here for scientific research, and here and here for anecdotal examples). Likewise, since these methods build soil, crowd out weeds and retain moisture, fertiliser and herbicide inputs can be reduced or eliminated entirely, resulting in higher profits for farmers. No-till methods can sequester as much as a ton of carbon per acre annually (2.5 tons/hectare). In the US alone, that could amount to nearly a quarter of current emissions.

Estimates of the total potential impact vary. Rattan Lal of Ohio State University argues that desertified and otherwise degraded soils could sequester up to 3bn tons of carbon per year (equal to 11bn tons of CO2, or nearly one third of current emissions). Other experts foresee even greater potential. According to research at the Rodale Institute, if instituted universally, organic regenerative techniques practiced on cultivated land could offset over 40% of global emissions, while practicing them on pasture land could offset 71%.

That adds up to land-based CO2 reduction of over 100% of current emissions – and that doesn’t even include reforestation and afforestation, which could offset another 10-15%, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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(However) regenerative agriculture cannot be implemented at scale without deep cultural changes. We must turn away from an attitude of nature-as-engineering-object to one of humble partnership. Whereas geoengineering is a global solution that feeds the logic of centralisation and the economics of globalism, regeneration of soil and forests is fundamentally local: forest by forest, farm by farm. These are not generic solutions, because the requirements of the land are unique to each place. Unsurprisingly, they are typically more labour-intensive than conventional practices, because they require a direct, intimate relationship to the land.

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Geoengineering, beyond its catastrophic risks, is an attempt to avoid that call, to extend the mindset of domination and control to new extremes, and to prolong an economy of overconsumption a few years longer. It is time to fall in love with the land, the soil, and the trees, to halt their destruction and to serve their restoration. It is time for agricultural policy and practice to become aligned with regeneration.

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Article excerpted from TheGuardian.com

This video further explains what geoengineering is trying to accomplish. Courtesy CBS News:

Featured image credit: news.thomasnet.com

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